Virginia passes law opposing Obama NDAA tyranny

Submitted by Freedomman on Thu, 05/17/2012 - 00:32

Lawmaker offers other states information on how to do the same thing.

NORFOLK, Virginia (PNN) - April 30, 2012 - Virginia has passed a new law that bars state cooperation with any federal detention of its citizens under illegitimate President Barack Obama’s National Defense Authorization Act of 2012, and a lead lawmaker there says other states should do the same.

“If Congress and the (illegitimate) president must suspend a citizen’s civil liberties guaranteed by the Constitution’s Bill of Rights (in order) to fight the war on terrorism, then we have lost that war, having lost the very purpose for which the war is being fought - to preserve the Amerikan constitutional republic,” Virginia Delegate Bob Marshall wrote in a letter this week to legislative leaders around the country.

Marshall’s HB.1160 passed the Virginia House of Delegates by a vote of 87-7, and the Virginia Senate 36-1 just a week ago, making Virginia the first state to approve such legislation.

His concern was that NDAA “literally turns the entire country into a military battlefield, conferring extraordinary powers on the (Fascist Police States of Amerika) armed forces against its own citizens.”

Marshall contends the federal law deprives citizens of the rights they are guaranteed under the FPSA and Virginia constitutions. When a FPSA senator noted that the federal plan originally included a provision preventing the illegitimate president from detaining people, the White House asked that it be removed.

“Obama then says, ‘I won’t use this ability.’ That’s odd. That’s troubling,” Marshall said.

Marshall offers lawmakers in other states information on how to prepare a similar bill on his DelegateBob.com site.

Marshall had offered the governor an 11-page legal analysis in support of the proposal that had been prepared by Herbert W. Titus, a former law school professor and recognized expert on constitutional issues.

Titus said in adopting the law, the governor “would fulfill the historic role of the states as being guardians of the people from usurpations of authority from the central government.”

Among the states that have begun addressing the issue, along with Virginia, are Arizona, Rhode Island, Maryland, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Washington.